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Immunology [020]

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B lymphocytes and plasma cells

B lymphocytes and plasma cells

B lymphocytes are principal cells that mediate humoral adaptive immunity. After their maturation in the bone marrow, B cells enter peripheral lymphoid tissues, which are the sites of interaction with foreign antigens. Production of antibodies is initiated by the interaction of antigens with a small number of mature B cells specific for each antigen. An antigen binds to the membrane receptors on specific B cells and initiates a series of responses that lead to two principal changes: cell proliferation resulting in expansion of the clone, and differentiation to either plasma cells actively secreting antibodies or to memory cells.

Key words: B cells, subsets of B cells, memory B cells, plasma cells

 
author: Milan Buc | discipline: Immunology, Allergology | viewed: 6592x | published on: 6.3.2017 | last modified on: 6.3.2017

Serological methods II

Serological methods II

Serological methods are basic diagnostic methods used to identify antibodies and antigens in patient sample. Up-to-date serological methods involve detection of unknown concentration of antigen or antibodies in patient sample using specific labelled antibodies. In immunodiagnostics, the most used serological methods are: immunofluorescence (IF), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), radioimmunoassay (RIA) and immunoblotting (Western blotting). Immunofluorescence (IF) detects antigens or antibodies by fluorochrome-labelled antibodies under fluorescence microscope. In the immunodiagnostics the IF is applied to detect autoantibodies in the tissue or patient serum. ELISA detects antigens and antibodies using enzyme-labelled antibodies following evaluation by spectrophotometry. In the immunodiagnostics, ELISA is widely used in quantitative analysis of autoantibodies, antibodies to vaccination antigens, bacterial and viral antigens, cytokines, etc. Radioimmunoassay (RIA) is a quantitative and sensitive diagnostic method to detect antigens or antibodies by radioisotope-labelled antibodies. In the immunodiagnostics, the RIA is used to detect the level of IgE involved in allergic reactions. Immunoblotting is a qualitative method based on protein separation in gel following by their transfer from the gel to the membrane and protein detection by enzyme-labelled antibodies. ELISA and immunoblotting belongs to the serological methods used in the confirmation of HIV positivity.

 
author: Vladimíra Ďurmanová | discipline: Immunology, Allergology | viewed: 2105x | published on: 1.10.2013 | last modified on: 1.10.2013

Practicals in Immunology No. 7: Diagnosis of Allergy

Practicals in Immunology No. 7: Diagnosis of Allergy

Presentation provides basic facts on allergic reactions - mechanism, symptoms, allergens. Main accent is put on diagnostic possibilities, both laboratory and in vivo (skin tests). Basic information about anaphylaxis and its management is included as well.                                                                   

 
author: Ivana Shawkatová | discipline: Immunology, Allergology | viewed: 1518x | published on: 24.5.2013 | last modified on: 24.5.2013

Practicals in Immunology No.6: Methods used in Transplantation Immunology (HLA-Typing)

Practicals in Immunology No.6: Methods used in Transplantation Immunology (HLA-Typing)

Presentation provides basic information on the HLA-complex and transplantation immunology, with focus on kidney and haematopoetic stem cell transplantations. Most important HLA-typing methods are explained as well as other techniques used in donor-recipient pair selection.           

 
author: Ivana Shawkatová | discipline: Immunology, Allergology | viewed: 2010x | published on: 24.5.2013 | last modified on: 24.5.2013

Serological methods I

Serological methods I

Serological methods are basic diagnostic methods used to identify antibodies and antigens in patient sample (serum, plasma). Agglutination and precipitation belong to classical serological methods that are used in diagnosis of infectious diseases (antibodies screening), serotyping of microorganisms and human blood group typing. Agglutination is based on reaction of particular (insoluble) antigen with antibodies, whereas precipitation involves reaction of colloidal (soluble) antigen and antibodies. In the immunodiagnostics an agglutination method as Coombs test is used to determine anti Rh antibodies in pregnant women (diagnosis of hemolytic disease of newborn). Another agglutination method involves latex agglutination that is used to determine, i.e. rheumatoid factor (diagnosis of autoimmune diseases) and hemagglutination method that can be used in, i.e. antibodies screening against Treponema pallidum, the main cause of syphilis. Radial immunodiffusion assay belongs to the precipitation method. This quantitative assay is based on immunodiffusion of antigens and antibodies in the gel and can be used in level analysis of complement components (C3, C4), inflammation proteins (CRP) and immunoglobulins (IgG, IgM and IgA). Modern precipitation methods performed in fluid involve nephelometry and turbidimetry.

 
author: Vladimíra Ďurmanová | discipline: Immunology, Allergology | viewed: 6202x | published on: 23.5.2013 | last modified on: 23.5.2013

Autoimmunity and autoimmune disease

Autoimmunity and autoimmune disease

The principal role of the immune system is to protect the organism from principally two the most dangerous events potentially threatening our life, i.e. infection and malignancy. However, sometimes the immune system instead of reacting against foreign and aberrant self-antigens can attack self-molecules. This inappropriate response of the immune system against self-components is termed autoimmunity.
There are 70 - 80 autoimmune disorders known till now and app. 5% of Caucasoid population suffers from them. Our understanding of autoimmunity has improved greatly during the last two decades, mainly because of the development of a variety of animal models of these diseases and the identification of genes that may predispose to autoimmunity. Nevertheless, the aetiology of most human autoimmune diseases remains still obscure.
The term “autoimmunity” is often erroneously used for a disease in which immune reactions accompany tissue injury; they are “a by-product” of a release of self-antigens to circulation without causing any damage; moreover, these “autoimmune reactions” help to degrade them and to remove them from the body.

 
author: Milan Buc | discipline: Immunology, Allergology | viewed: 3367x | published on: 9.4.2013 | last modified on: 13.5.2013

Foeto-maternal relationships. The immune system of newborns

Foeto-maternal relationships. The immune system of newborns

A success of pregnancy depends on a proper implantation and induction of immune tolerance. The immune system secures it by various mechanisms – special cells, cytokines, HLA molecules, peripheral tolerance take part in.

The immune system of the newborn has also its own specifics as it matures relatively long time till it reaches the same protective ability as characteristic for adults.

 
author: Milan Buc | discipline: Immunology, Allergology | viewed: 2076x | published on: 9.5.2012 | last modified on: 9.5.2012

Immunodeficiencies. AIDS

Immunodeficiencies. AIDS

The lecture deals with primary and secondary immunodefeciencies. It gives an overview on general clinical manifestations and their divisions according to the type of the immune functions defects. Must of the lecture devotes to AIDS.     

 
author: Milan Buc | discipline: Immunology, Allergology | viewed: 2486x | published on: 3.5.2012 | last modified on: 3.5.2012

Type I hypersensitivity (Allergy)

Type I hypersensitivity (Allergy)

Type I hypersensitivity belongs to the most common disorder mediated by immune reactions; it affects app. more than 30% of all individuals in Caucasoid population. Type I hypersensitivity is commonly called allergy. It is characterised by rapid onset (hence the term immediate hypersensitivity), within minutes of antigen challenge, and results in conspicuous clinical symptoms.

 
author: Milan Buc | discipline: Immunology, Allergology | viewed: 2286x | published on: 4.4.2012 | last modified on: 4.4.2012

Cytokines. PAMPs and PRRs

Cytokines. PAMPs and PRRs

Cytokines are soluble peptides that induce activation, proliferation and differentiation of cells of the immune system. Moreover, cytokines influence functions of cells of other tissues and organs, esp. of nervous and endocrine systems. They act in very low concentrations (10-10 M) what makes them to be like hormones. However, hormones tend to be produced constitutively and are produced by endocrine organs. Cytokines, on the contrary, are secreted after activation of particular cells and secretion is short-lived, generally ranging from a few hours to a few days and there are no specialised organs for their synthesis. Cytokines influence target cell in 4 different ways, synergistic, antagonistic, pleiotropic, and redundant way, respectively. They ca act in a autocrine, paracrine and endocrine manner. There are many cytokines that can be divided into those regulating innate and adaptive immunity, to the group of cytokines endowed by chemotactic properties and those supporting growth of hematopoietic and immune system cells.

 

 
author: Milan Buc | discipline: Immunology, Allergology | viewed: 4494x | published on: 16.3.2012 | last modified on: 28.3.2012
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